Dill

May 02nd 2018


Dill

Dill - What’s the Deal?

 Did you know that many athletes drink pickle juice to stave off the effects of overheating during warm weather competitions? With the ready supply of dill in Russia, maybe we’ll see sports bottles of brine on the soccer sidelines this summer.


4 things you never knew about dill

Here are some more fast facts about dill you can use for trivia games and bar bets:


  • Dill is a member of the parsley family (so are carrots, for that matter)

  • Its name comes from the Norse word for “lull” or “soothe” (Dilla)

  • Greek and Roman soldiers once used it to speed up the healing of wounds

  • In Medieval times, Europeans used it for protection from witches, and for love potions


The love affair with dill spread north to Scandinavia and Russia, due in no small part to the fact it can be grown close to the Arctic Circle. Dill-seasoned seafood, sauces, soups, and pickled fish and vegetables are staples of northern diets.


Canadians love the leafy green herb, too. Between flavouring seasonal dishes (a cucumber and dill yogurt parfait by the pool sounds glorious, doesn’t it?), and pickling fresh produce, interest in dill surges like clockwork every July and August in Canada.


What you can do with dill (other than brew magic potions)

Dill is mild in flavour, adding a subtle, but distinct grassy freshness when used in moderation. Used in quantity, however, dill can be an intense, almost challenging flavour. Think about a big, fresh dill pickle and see if you can keep your mouth from watering.


Finding a home for dill is easy - it works especially well with anything salty, savoury, or creamy, and plays equally nice with meat and vegetables. Internationally, you can hardly do tzatziki without it, and it turns plain beet soup into borscht. Many cocktails, especially those based on gin or aquavit, also have a dash of the green stuff.


Even health and wellness adherents are loving dill. Dill boasts many health benefits including vitamins A and C, iron, manganese, and folate. Using high-quality dill is a simple, tasty way to add flavour and function to any health-forward meal, snack, or beverage product.


While it may not top any lists of exotic seasonings, dill has the power to drive flavour and functionality across multiple product categories. To learn more about this marvellous (if not actually magical) herb, request your sample and information kit today.